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TRANSCRIPTION OF LETTER
FROM SURVIVOR OF HMS GALATEA

to relative of Warrant Officer L.G. Boulter
30 Newcomer Road
Dartmouth
Devon
March 29
th   1942

Dear Mrs. Pedrick,

Please accept my apologies for the delay in answering your letter. I fully understand how anxious you must have been these last few months.

Yes I am a survivor from the "Galatea" and being a Warrant Officer myself lived with Mr. Boulter - "Ben" to us, for three very happy months, as I only joined "her" in October 41. I am afraid I can give you no hope at all, your brother was most certainly killed by the explosion of one of the three torpedoes that hit the ship, the only consolation is that he would know nothing about it and certainly did not suffer. You ask me in your letter to give you what details I can about the actual end so I will do my best to tell you. About 11.45 p.m. on the 14th December while we were at sea, we had an "Alarm" which lasted 10 minutes but led to nothing. Ben's station at this alarm was on the Bridge and at 11.55 p.m. when the "alarm" ended he went down to the Warrant Officer's Mess to have a smoke and chat. At exactly midnight the ship was struck with three torpedoes, one of which was alongside if not in the W.O's Mess. The ship turned over very quickly and in less than three minutes had disappeared. Both Captain Sim and Comdr.Harrison were in the water but were unfortunately not fished up as the weather was rather rough and it was also a moonless night. The schoolmaster Mr. Claridge and myself were the only Warrant Officers saved from the seven that were in our Mess. I am terribly sorry I cannot give you any happier news, but one thing I am sure you would like to know and that was the popularity of your brother. He was liked by every officer in the ship from the Captain down and respected by the ship's company and those who worked under him.

I am afraid I cannot give you any news about the Neptune. I have heard that there are survivors prisoners and do hope that your brother-in-law is safe and that you will have good news soon.

I am afraid this letter is a little disjointed - it has been rather a difficult one to write but I do hope if there is anything else I can do for you or tell you, that you won't hesitate to let me know.

Trusting again that you will hear good news re the Neptune.

I am,
Yours very sincerely,
W. E. Miller